Are inspectors the answer?

19blogpostAprInspector

In January, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care reported it would be hiring 100 more inspectors.  Is this really the answer to our ailing long-term care home systems?  Read more here.

Not so, according to this family member’s perspective:

“More inspectors are not the answer.  Deming and other quality improvement experts have shown time and time again that you can’t just ‘inspect’ quality into a system or workplace.  Inspection needs to be partnered with giving workers the tools and resources to do their work.  Trying to balance residents’ individual wants and needs with too few staff to meet them is an unwinnable state.  The long-term care system needs serious reform that includes feedback from residents, families, staff and the provincial government” – Pat Piaskowsk.  Read more here.

The number of inspectors continues to rise – from 102 (2013/14)  to 148 (2016/17).  And now, 100 more?  The cost of 248 inspectors, at an average of $85,000/yr (not including benefits and pensions) is approximately $21 million/year!

The outcry for additional personal support workers in long-term care isn’t new and isn’t the only part of the system that’s broken; perhaps the system would be better served by re-directing some of these dollars into transforming the long-term care home systems with a total culture change that provides a supportive community for staff, family and friends where relationships matter most.

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4 Replies to “Are inspectors the answer?”

  1. Totally agree. It is always better to invest in prevention (education and training) rather than trying to fix things once the damage has been done in the case of LTC, abuse, neglect and death.

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